Leasing of Crown land

A lease grants an exclusive right to occupy a defined area of land.

Crown land is typically leased by the responsible minister, a delegate of the responsible minister, the Governor in Council or a delegated land manager. Who leases the land, for how long and under what terms depends on the relevant legislation and context.

Where land is leased by a delegated land manager, these leases are subject to approval by the responsible minister or delegate of the responsible minister.

Leasing Policy for Crown land in Victoria

The objective of the Leasing Policy for Crown land in Victoria is to provide a consistent framework for the leasing of Crown land by formalising ‘Crown Land Leasing Principles’ at a State-wide level. These principles will guide land managers, existing tenants and prospective tenants, help inform decision making around leasing and improve community awareness of government policy for the leasing of Crown land. The policy applies to the Crown Land (Reserves) Act 1978, the Forests Act 1958 and the Land Act 1958.

DELWP Leasing Policy for Crown land in Victoria 2010 (PDF, 703.5 KB)
DELWP  Leasing Policy for Crown land in Victoria (accessible version) (RTF, 362.4 KB)

The Crown land leasing guidelines accompany the Leasing Policy for Crown land in Victoria, and provide information about statutory requirements associated with leases under the legislation mentioned above, along with other relevant legislation.

DELWP Crown Land Leasing Guidelines 2012 (PDF, 3.5 MB)
DELWP Crown Land Leasing Guidelines 2012 (accessible version) (DOC, 158.0 KB)

If another body (e.g. a committee of management) manages the Crown land, any proposed lease will need to be supported by them, before we can consider an application.

Tourism Leasing in National Parks

This guidance note provides an overview of the principles and procedures that the government will apply when considering a proposal for private investment for appropriate, small scale development inside a national park under a lease of up to 21 years. It accompanies changes to the National Parks Act 1975 to reduce the maximum term of a lease under the general leasing power (section 19G) to 21 years.

Tourism Leases in National Parks Guidance Note (PDF, 1.2 MB)
Tourism Leases in National Parks Guidance Note (DOCX, 2.7 MB)

Licensing of Crown land

A licence is a non-exclusive use of Crown land. Like leases, licences are typically issued by the responsible minister, a delegate of the responsible minister, the Governor in Council or a delegated land manager.

Where land is licenced by a delegated land manager, these licences are subject to approval by the responsible minister or delegate of the responsible minister.

Licences for Crown land can be issued for specified uses under legislation, e.g. agricultural purposes such as grazing, and for other uses that may not be specified explicitly under legislation.

General licence of Crown land

A general licence of Crown land is for non-agricultural purposes which can include uses of gravel extraction, scout/guide hall, water storage and recreation/tourism.

General Crown Land Licences (PDF, 81.8 KB)
General Crown Land Licences (accessible version) (DOCX, 100.8 KB)

Licensing of Unused Roads for agricultural uses

A licence for unused roads is for an owner/occupier of the adjoining private land for agricultural use.

Licensing of Unused Roads for Agricultural Uses (PDF, 94.9 KB)
Licensing of Unused Roads for Agricultural Uses (accessible version) (DOCX, 96.2 KB)

Crown land water frontage licensing

Crown land water frontage is Crown land that runs alongside waterways. These areas contain important cultural heritage and environmental values that need to be managed alongside other land uses such as grazing, stock access to water and recreational uses such as walking, fishing or bird watching.

We are working closely with our partner agencies and neighbouring landholders to protect and improve Crown land water frontages while enabling most appropriate use of the areas through the issuing of water frontage licences.

Managing Crown water frontages (PDF, 841.5 KB)
Managing Crown water frontages (accessible version) (DOCX, 19.8 KB)

A Crown water frontage licence does not remove the public’s right to enter and remain on the land for certain recreational purposes.

Information on public access to Crown water frontage and what recreational activities can and can’t be undertaken is available in Crown water frontage: A guide to public access and recreational use.

Crown water frontage: A guide to public access and recreational use (PDF, 190.6 KB)
Crown water frontage: A guide to public access and recreational use (accessible version) (RTF, 395.8 KB)

A general water frontage licence gives stock direct access to a waterway

Crown land water frontage licences (PDF, 383.4 KB)
Crown land water frontage licences (accessible version) (DOCX, 270.9 KB)

A clear explanation of Crown water frontage licence conditions is provided in Crown water frontages: An explanatory guide to your licence conditions.

Crown water frontages: An explanatory guide to your licence conditions (PDF, 866.2 KB)
Crown water frontages: An explanatory guide to your licence conditions (accessible version) (RTF, 1.6 MB)

Crown water frontage licences: A guide to understanding your licence conditions (PDF, 233.1 KB)
Crown water frontage licences: A guide to understanding your licence conditions (accessible version) (RTF, 316.2 KB)

A riparian management licence ensures stock access to a waterway is managed to both protect and improve the riparian environment

Riparian management licences (PDF, 160.3 KB)
Riparian management licences (accessible version) (DOCX, 179.3 KB)

Licensees who fence the Crown frontage to prevent stock access to the waterway can have a take and use licence from their local water corporation to access water for stock. 

If licensees undertake the fencing with their local CMA, the CMA will reimburse the water corporation application fee for the take and use licence. The first three years of annual fees will also be waived.

Visit Changes to take and use licences

Permits on Crown Land

Events on public land

Permits are typically required for events proposed to be run on land managed by DELWP.

Visit Events on Public Land

Filming and Photography

Permits are required for filming and photography within the 3.1 million hectares of State forest and Crown land managed by DELWP.

Visit Filming and Photography

Minor forest produce

The taking of minor forest produce such as the collection of eucalyptus oil or seed, apiculture and extraction of sand or gravel require a licence or permit.

To obtain or find out if a licence or permit is required please contact us.

Tour operators

A person or business who conducts a guided tour or recreational activity for profit on public land is required to hold a tour operator licence. For more information visit Who needs a Tour Operator Licence?

Visit Tour Operators